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Lunch and Learn: APA Style

Basic Examples for a Reference List

Article in a periodical:

Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year). Title of article.Title of Periodical,

            volume number(issue number), pages. doi:http://dx.doi.org/xx.xxx/yyyyy 

Book:

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle.

            Location: Publisher.

Website

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of document. Retrieved

         from http://Web address

What is a DOI?

From the APA Style website:

A digital object identifier (DOI) is a unique alphanumeric string assigned by a registration agency (the International DOI Foundation) to identify content and provide a persistent link to its location on the Internet. The publisher assigns a DOI when your article is published and made available electronically.

All DOI numbers begin with a 10 and contain a prefix and a suffix separated by a slash. The prefix is a unique number of four or more digits assigned to organizations; the suffix is assigned by the publisher and was designed to be flexible with publisher identification standards.

We recommend that when DOIs are available, you include them for both print and electronic sources. The DOI is typically located on the first page of the electronic journal article, near the copyright notice. The DOI can also be found on the database landing page for the article.

Example DOI: doi:10.1080/10875301.2013.800013

Where can I get more help with APA?

Purdue's Online Writing Lab (OWL) One of the best sources online to find out about everything APA

APA Style FAQ from the official APA website

Email your questions to the APA Style Experts, they will get back to you in 24 hours

Check out the APA Style Blog to watch vidoes, see the questions the experts are answering and more

Purdue OWL APA Poster  Most everything you need to know on one page!

Library Databases and Citation Help

The library's database services provide you with citations for your Reference List. This can save you loads of time. Unfortunately, sometimes the citations are not 100% correct. Let's take a look at a couple of examples. 

This is a citation for a CQ Researcher Report:

McCutcheon, C. (2013, August 30). Government

      surveillance. CQ Researcher23, 717-740.  Retrieved from

       http://library.cqpress.com/cqresearcher/

It looks fabulous! And that's just how it came out of the database. You can copy and paste that citation into your Reference List.

Now let's look at a citation from EBSCO:

Watson, S. E., Rex, C., Markgraf, J., Kishel, H., Jennings, E., & Hinnant, K. (2013). Revising the "One-Shot" through Lesson Study: Collaborating with Writing Faculty to Rebuild a Library Instruction Session. College & Research Libraries74(4), 381-398.

Do you see anything wrong? Me too. First, there is no hanging indent. Also, every word in title of this article is capitalized. Only the first word should be capitalized. And the Reference List should be double-spaced, just like the rest of your paper. Those thing would need to be fixed in your Reference List. 

So take advantage of the assistance you get in library databases but double-check!